Opioid Agonist Therapy

What is opioid agonist therapy?

Opioid agonist therapy (OAT) is an effective treatment for addiction to opioid drugs such as heroin, oxycodone, fentanyl and Percocet.

The therapy involves taking medications that work to prevent withdrawal and reduce cravings for opioid drugs. Common medications include Methadone or buprenorphine (Suboxone). These medicines:

  • Reduce risk for overdose and other dangers associated with using opioids

  • Reduce risk for relapse

  • Promote connections with health and substance use services

How does opioid agonist therapy work?

Methadone and Suboxone are long-acting opioid drugs that replace the shorter-acting opioids the person is addicted to. By acting slowly in the body, the therapy prevents withdrawal without causing a person to get high. OAT also helps to reduce or eliminate cravings for opioid drugs.

Treatment works best when combined with other types of support, such as individual or group counselling.

How can I get treatment?

You don’t need a referral for OAT treatment, and it can be discreetly prescribed by a physician or nurse practitioner.

Contact your primary care provider, visit a walk-in clinic, or contact a community OAT clinic to learn about treatment availability. Find an OAT clinic that is accepting patients.

Ask your care provider if you qualify for free OAT treatment.

Locations

 

General Information on Opioid Agonist Therapy

Referral Required?
Required
How to Get Referral

Contact your primary care provider, visit a walk-in clinic, or contact a community OAT clinic to learn about treatment availability. Find an OAT clinic that is accepting patients.

News & Events

RAAC

Island Health expands two programs to better support people living with addiction

Victoria – People living with addiction and people who are ready to begin a pathway to recovery will now have greater access to the services they need.

Read more

Pandora Avenue Supervised Consumption Site Officially Named “The Harbour”

Pandora Avenue Supervised Consumption Site officially named “The Harbour”

Victoria – Exactly one month after it opened, the Pandora Avenue Supervised Consumption site has officially been named “The Harbour” – reflecting the service’s purpose to provide a safe place – or harbour – where people can use illegal drugs under supervision by trained health professionals and p

Read more

Intensive residential treatment beds for addictions open in the Comox Valley

Intensive residential treatment beds for addictions open in the Comox Valley

Comox Valley - Clients needing longer term, residentially-based addictions treatment services can now access 11 intensive residential treatment beds at the Comox Valley Recovery Centre.

Read more