Opioid Agonist Therapy

Opioid agonist therapy (OAT) helps treat addiction to opioid drugs such as heroin, oxycodone, fentanyl and Percocet.

The therapy involves taking medications that prevent withdrawal and reduce cravings. Medications include Methadone or buprenorphine (Suboxone)

  • Reduce risk for overdose and other dangers associated with using opioids

  • Reduce risk for relapse

  • Promote connections with health and substance use services

How does opioid agonist therapy work?

Methadone and Suboxone act slowly in the body, and prevent withdrawal without causing a person to get high. OAT also helps to reduce or eliminate cravings for opioid drugs.

Get treatment

You don’t need a referral, and most therapies are covered for residents of BC. Visit a doctor or care provider to explore treatment options.

Treatment for substance dependency, including opioids, works best when combined with other types of support, such as individual or group counselling. There is no such thing as a “one-size-fits-all” approach to treatment and recovery. Whichever treatment path you choose, be sure that it has everything you need to help you achieve wellness.

Find an OAT clinic that is accepting patients

Locations

 

General Information on Opioid Agonist Therapy

Referral Required?
Required
How to Get Referral

Contact your primary care provider, visit a walk-in clinic, or contact a community OAT clinic to learn about treatment availability. Find an OAT clinic that is accepting patients.

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